FEATURED: The Protocube V2 3D Printed Gamecube Portable by Protobug

Modeled after the line of case designs of RedmagusX’s Gamecube Portables (one of which we covered earlier here), Modder Protobug 3D Printed the case out of PLA at his School to create his second Gamecube Portable, deemed the ProtoCube V2.


SPECIFICATIONS:

-3D Printed PLA case
-5 inch TFT 16:9 screen
-Wasp drive replacement & SDgecko
-Full press + “click” L & R triggers
-Front Z Button
-Original GC controller layout
-Player 2 port
-1 hour of gameplay on batteries

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The case models were designed in Solidworks, using the same footprint as the Gamecube portables by RedmagnusX. The case halves, dpad and L & R buttons were 3D Printed using PLA. The analog stick and A, B, X & Y are from the original controller, using Fluxedo’s Button Template to achieve the correct face button layout.

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The case was printed using PLA (a soy-based biodegradable filament) on the BCN3D+ 3D Printer, at about 10 hours for the front and about 8 for the back. A dark forest green filament was used on the front and red on the back to achieve the two-tone color scheme. Screw wells, posts, spacers and chambers were made to house and secure all the various parts such as the screen, controller boards, speakers, fans, and motherboards.

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Pretty clean on the inside. One of the advantages of 3D Printed cases is that you can design the case to accommodate every part so all the components don’t turn into a jumbled rats nest.

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For more information on the Protocube V2 you can view the worklog here, and some of his other projects via Modretro. A Youtube Video is coming soon and will be added in when available.


One thought on “FEATURED: The Protocube V2 3D Printed Gamecube Portable by Protobug

  1. Hi everyone 🙂 I’m quite new to 3d printing and I have a lot of questions on the matter, so I hope you will not get mad at me for asking here at least couple of them. I think even before I’ll get seriously into sculpting I should focus on the software I’m going to use, and that’s what I’d like to ask you about. Mainly, should I start with the most simple and crudest program I can find or would it be better to start on something more complex? I’m worried that I’ll get some unwanted habits while working with less complex software. My second question is about the CAD software as well: should I search for software that would let me design and slice it in it, or should I use a different software for each? Does it even make a difference? Weirdly, I couldn’t find the answer to that, as it seems like most websites want to focus on the very basics (like what is 3d printing and so on), and while the answers to those questions are fine, it seems like no one wants to go into the details (it looks like some of them even plagiarise each other! I swear I’ve found the same answers to the same questions on at least 3 different articles) but I’m getting off-topic… The last question is about 3d pens. Would it be possible to somehow convert whatever I draw with a 3d pen to a 3d model in a CAD software? For example, if I’ll draw a horse with 3d pen, would it be possible to get its design in a software? I’m not sure how that would even work, but the very idea sounds appealing to me. Anyway, I think I’ll stop here just in case no one will ever answer me and all of this writing will be for nothing. I’m sorry that I’m using your content to ask questions, but I hope you can relate and advice a rookie like me. Anyway, thank you for posting. I learned something from this and that’s always appreciated. Thank you, and I hope to hear back from you very soon 🙂

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